Construction Inspections

EMA Construction Inspections Ft. Lauderdale, Tampa, Orlando, Miami, Palm Beach

EMA Engineers provide   construction inspections reporting to developers, contractors, architects:

We offer field observation reporting on structural engineering work-in-progress. Our reports include photographic and written daily reports depicting various construction activities.

We attend construction meetings, construction coordination meeting and post-construction review. We also provide detailed field observations reporting on a monthly basis prepared by structural engineers.

Our process of observation and reporting can include review daily construction activities. We check compliance with structural drawings for projects.

EMA prepares and review construction inspections of contract documents, job specifications, change order details and review, and project final closeout documents.

EMA Field Observation Reporting & Construction Observation Activities
The architect’s responsibilities for observing construction and determining if the contractor is supporting the design intent fall into six categories:
construction observation, document clarification, submittal review.
payments to the contractor, certification of completion, and project closeout.
Observing Construction
The architect is typically required by contract to keep the owner apprised of construction progress and quality. The owner relies on these reports to keep up with the progress and quality of the work, and a close owner architect relationship can result from this direct form of communication.
To document what the engineers has observed in the field and enable the delivery of this information to the client, the architect can use AIA Document G711™, Architect’s Field Report. As with all document types issued repeatedly during a project, each report should be dated and sequentially numbered

EMA roof Engineers Inspectors

EMA Roof Engineers Inspectors

EMA roof engineers inspectors can inspect and perform roof inspections on any roof system including concrete roofs, gravel and shingled roofs. After hurricanes, or natural disasters including lightening strikes the roof may get damaged. That is where we send our professional engineers and inspectors to do a thorough inspections of roofing and intent of damages for insurance claim purpose and repairs.

EMA roof engineers inspectors perform various structural roofing inspections including initial tig-tag , structural in progress and structural final inspections for shingled, tile roofs. We also perform roof static uplift test TAS-105, TAS-106, Bell Chamber (TAS-124), Thermal Imaging etc. Various Services are performed and a Sealed and Signed report is prepared for the client.

We also perform structural roofing inspections for all shingle, metal & clay tile or concrete tile roofs as per Florida building code chapter 15. please call for our services.

Inspections & Testing

EMA Roof Engineers inspectors performs detailed, professional visual inspections with state-of-the-art moisture detection devices and gives thorough explanations with digital pictures.

AFFILLIATED

Florida Registered Professional Engineer
Mississippi Professional Engineers
Louisiana Professional Engineers
Special Inspectors Florida
SBCCI Building inspector.

TAS 105 – Fastener Withdrawal Resistance Testing
TAS 106 – Uplift Resistance Testing Tile Roof
TAS 109 – Polyurethane Foam Roofing (pending certification).
TAS 124 – Existing and New Roof Wind Uplift Resistance Testing.
TAS 126 – Roof Moisture Survey – Nuclear/Infrared (pending certification

INSPECTION PROCEDURES

The starting point of the Inspection should be the interior of the building. The interior walls and ceilings should be checked for signs of water staining. After inspecting the interior a thorough inspection of the exterior walls should be made along with the roof system.

The following roof components should be inspected:

Flashing: These are the protection for the membrane termination and often provide a waterproof cover at the membrane termination. These include Counter- flashing, expansion joint covers, copings and flashing at walls and curbs. A variety of problems may occur at these vulnerable locations.

Penetrations: These are pipes, drains, vents, stacks and other items that penetrate the roof membrane. These MUST be flashed properly to assure a watertight roof system.

Field Membrane – What to look for:

· Open seams excessive blisters, wrinkles, ridges or areas of non-adhered membrane.
· Worn spots holes or deteriorated areas of the membrane.
· Deteriorated, areas of surface coating on the membrane.
· Adequate, drainage and ponding problems of the membrane.
· Areas around rooftop equipment that may have been degraded by leaks or spills or punctured by dropped equipment parts.